Bolivia Independence Day

Bolivia Independence Day

Bolivia Independence Day became official on August 6th, 1825 before that date Bolivia had been occupied and under the control of Spain for centuries As it was this country’s vast wealth (mainly silver) that funded Spain during the New World Spanish Empire, of course this same wealth help make Potosi the second largest city in the world. Check out our condensed Bolivia’s history page to learn more about this country’s struggle for independence.

Once called the Republic of Bolivia, this country is now known as the “Plurinational State of Bolivia”, which for over 184 years had faced many obstacles on it’s way to becoming an independent country. As with most South American country’s it’s independence day is celebrated in a similar way each year, typically with fireworks, colorful parades, folklore music and dancing.

Bolivia Independence Day Parade

Bolivia Independence Day Parade

And of course all schools, government buildings, and banks are closed for the day. Traditionally the celebration of it’s independence day begins in the capital of Bolivia, Sucre, which is located in the Chuquisaca department, for a special congressional session at the “Casa de la Libertad” or “House of Freedom.” It was here in the “Casa de la Libertad” on August 6th, 1825 that Bolivia’s Declaration of independence was signed. Once at the “Casa de la Libertad” the president (who arrives as early as 6 a.m with several minsters) addresses the country to give his speech, and promises improvements for all Bolivians.

Bolivia Independence Day In Other Major Cities

Bolivia Independence Day In Other Major Cities

Bolivia Independence Day In Other Major Cities – Photo by Tetsuo MIYAMA

In Santa Cruz, La Paz, Cochabamba, and all the other cities, independence day is mostly celebrated with parades, procession, and speeches made by each cities mayor. Each major city tries to outdo each other with there parades that consist of people dancing on the street in brightly colored traditional costumes followed by pickup trucks with speakers in the back playing folklore music on full blast, and huge wreathes of flowers that are placed at the feet of statues symbolizing Bolivia’s independence. The streets and sidewalks are so crowded that the Bolivian people often find themselves lost on there very own streets!

So it comes as no surprise that during these days hundreds (if not thousands!) of tourist fly to Bolivia on August 6th, to enjoy and celebrate independence day along with this country’s warm and cheery people.




 
Bolivia Independence Day
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